Nine things you should know before studying WSET Level 3

Last year, I joined the drinks business as a reporter.

Like most people, I more or less fell into the drinks industry. To extend the metaphor, I landed on my feet and hit the ground running by enrolling in the WSET’s Level 2 course, which I passed with flying colours.

The Level 2 is great for anyone who wants to learn more about wine, but recruiters in the alcohol sector often need you to have more knowledge than that. Some employers require at least a Diploma before they even look at the rest of your your CV.

In the interests of a thorough review, feeling confident at tastings, and working towards the shiny WSET L4,  I enrolled in the wine-focused Level 3 in February this year.

What followed was six months of existential doubt, night terrors (no, really), and an eye twitch I still need to get checked out. Other than that, it was great.

If you’re about to embark on your own course, take a look at the few things I wish I’d known before I started, and you may well do better than me.

Note: This course was funded in part by the drinks business and by the WSET.

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