Camden Town to unveil revamped brewery and restaurant

Fresh from launching its ‘pubs for hedgehogs’ concept, Camden Town has ensured humans are catered for too, unveiling plans for a revamped brewery and 50-seater restaurant to open in the summer.

The London brewery will be undertaking a redesign of its original site, constructing a 50-seat restaurant, extended taproom, outdoor drinking and dining space, brewery shop and new tour experience.

The work is expected to be completed in this summer. To allow for the alterations to be made, its existing brewery bar on Wilkins Street Mews has closed, with a temporary pop-up bar nearby set to open on 1 March.

Once ready, the site will feature the brewery’s first full-scale kitchen, offering a fresh seasonal menu devised by a soon to be announced “local chef partner”.

The beers on offer will include Camden’s full core range as well as its seasonal and Arch 55 series beers.

Founder of Camden Town, Jasper Cuppaidge, said: “I couldn’t be more excited about the continued transformation of our first home in Camden at Wilkin Street Mews.

“As the home of Hells, we will continue to bring the freshest beer experience and now with the extensive changes, we’ll have the capacity and resource to be able to not only offer but also host one of the very best beer drinking experiences.

“It promises to be an oasis for beer drinkers, and the development will see the space become a community hub for beer, food, entertainment and education.”

Cuppaidge founded Camden Town in 2010 and the brewery now boasts a core range of five beers, including its Hells Lager, as well as series of smaller batch, seasonal beers. In 2015, it was sold to AB InBev to help fund further growth.

Two years later, the Camden Town opened a £30 million brewery in Enfield, expanding its production to 400,000 hectolitres a year.

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