Paris to shut bars for two weeks

French capital Paris is to close its bars for two weeks from tomorrow as the city’s Covid-19 alert level is raised to ‘maximum’.

The French government had warned last week that extra restrictions could be imposed in cities including Paris, Lille, Lyon, Grenoble and Toulouse as the number of coronavirus cases continues to rise.

France grades the risk in each region, from no alert, alert, heightened alert to the ‘maximum alert’ level.

According to Agence France Presse, Paris and its three inner suburbs (Hauts-de-Seine, Seine-Saint-Denis and Val-de-Marn) must close all bars for 15 days from tomorrow (Tuesday 6 October).

Restaurants and bistros that serve food, as well as alcohol, can remain open but must impose stricter measures, including collecting customer details, and close by 10pm.

It follows news last week of the enforced closure of all bars and restaurants in Marseille.

On Sunday (4 October), France reported a total of 13,627 cases of Covid-19 and the country now has an infection rate of 270 per 100,000 people.

In a statement, Employment Minister Elisabeth Borne said the situation in Paris and its immediate localities was “very worrying” and called on companies to prioritise remote working.

Elsewhere in Europe, the Spanish capital of Madrid has also imposed stricter measures, requiring all restaurants and bars to close by 8pm and restricting travel outside of the region.

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