BrewDog launches low alcohol Punk IPA

Scottish multinational brewery and pub chain BrewDog has launched a low alcohol version of its flagship beer, Punk IPA.

Called Punk AF, the beer is made with Ahtanum, Cascade, Chinook, Citra, Hüll Melon, Mosaic, Nelson Sauvin, Simcoe hops, and promises “all the attitude, all the flavour but none of the alcohol,” according to the brewer’s website.

Diageo, for example, now has a whole department dedicated to the no-alcohol category. There’s also been a smattering of alcohol-free bars opening over the past few years, including the Virgin Mary in Dublin (May 2019), London’s Redemption chain and Listen Bar in New York.

The launch of Punk AF means that Brewdog now has two lower ABV beers in its portfolio, having already launched the 1.1% ABV Nanny State in 2009. Nanny State, which the brewer claims was launched in response to complaints over its high-strength, 18.2% Tokyo Stout, has become one of its best-selling products in the off-trade.

The new low ABV beer is available in Brewdog’s UK bars as well as select off-trade premises since 9 May.

Low ABV beer is one of the fastest-growing drinks categories in UK supermarkets. More than half of Brits who took part in a OnePoll survey last year said they have at least tried a non-alcoholic beverage, while 52% also said that non-alcoholic beers have become more socially acceptable in the past two years.

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